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GE Healthcare Marks World Alzheimer’s Day 2012

Raising

Raising awareness of Alzheimer’s disease is important: according to Alzheimer’s Disease International, approximately 36 million people are living with dementia. 

MIND

MIND online, a place where those who are affected by neurodegenerative diseases can share their stories.

GE Healthcare has made a global commitment to tackling Alzheimer’s disease. Building on the strengths of GE Healthcare’s technology and diagnostic portfolios, the company is able to address this disease in a number of ways by researching biomarkers, partnering with pharmaceutical companies on clinical trials, as well as investigating and developing imaging agents to look at the root cause of the disease. Additionally it is designing scanners and software to transform the management of Alzheimer’s disease.

M.I.N.D. (Making an Impact on Neurodegenerative Diseases) is GE Healthcare’s company-wide commitment to addressing global issues related to neurodegenerative diseases – including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease that was launched nearly a year ago. The company is partnering with expert organizations and individuals around the world to educate consumers; drive efforts to support patients, families, and caregivers affected by neurodegenerative disease; and to identify ways to reduce the costs of disease management.

The education campaign has already begun with M.I.N.D. Online, a place where those who are affected by neurodegenerative diseases can share their stories.

“People who are touched by these diseases are at the core of the M.I.N.D. campaign and we want to hear from them about how these diseases have affected their lives,” said Pascale Witz, President and CEO, GE Healthcare, Medical Diagnostics. “We are committed to improving medical care and quality of life for patients and for caregivers, and will use our expertise and our voice to call on policymakers to act to alleviate the suffering caused by neurodegenerative disease.”

Raising awareness of Alzheimer’s disease is important: according to Alzheimer’s Disease International, approximately 36 million people are living with dementia, (including Alzheimer’s disease) and by 2050 the number of cases will more than triple.[i] A recent survey by Working Mother Research Institute sponsored by GE Healthcare found that only 13 percent of Alzheimer’s caregivers have talked to their doctor about their risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease although 60 percent of caregivers have done research on it and some believe they might also have the disease.


The importance of early diagnosis

According to the survey, 51 percent of caregivers reported that they wished that their loved one had been diagnosed at an earlier stage to benefit from appropriate interventions and to participate in making decisions about medical options.ii

Because caregivers and other family members of patients with Alzheimer’s disease usually make all the arrangements for another person, including long-term care insurance and end-of-life care options, they know how hard the process can be. Additionally, 84 percent of survey participants stated that they would like to be diagnosed early if they develop the disease; one of the top reasons was to spare their families the responsibility of making financial and medical decisions on their behalf, as well as being able to participate in decision-making about medical options for treatment and care .ii

GE Healthcare would like to hear from you about how you or someone you know has benefitted by accurate, early detection. Please submit your story at www.mindonlinecampaign.com. Telling that story may help change the course of another person’s life.