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#Getfit and EU Week Against Cancer Strive Towards Same Goal in Cancer Fight

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GE Healthcare's #GetFit campaign and its drive to promote cancer prevention coincides with the European Week Against Cancer 2013

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Social networks can be used to share diet tips that contribute to a healthy lifestyle.

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The #GetFit campaign aims to connect and engage users in supporting one another into making long-term lifestyle changes

GE Healthcare’s #GetFit campaign and its drive to promote cancer prevention coincides with the European Week Against Cancer 2013. Led by the Association of European Cancer Leagues, a pan-European NGO, the European Week Against Cancer focuses on lifestyle messages seeking solutions to cancer prevention through promoting healthy lifestyles.

The pan-European message has numerous connotations for the nations taking part. Across the world cancer rates are generally increasing at a significant rate, accelerated by a sedentary lifestyle, poor diet and limited access to healthcare facilities. 

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), cancer causes 20% of deaths in the European Region. With 1.7 million deaths each year, cancer is the most important cause of death and morbidity in Europe after cardiovascular diseases.*

Europe comprises only one eighth of the total world population but has around one quarter of the global total of cancer cases: some 3.2 million new patients per year. Tobacco consumption and excessive alcohol consumption have been found to cause approximately 40% of the total cancer burden. If the consequences of inappropriate diet, obesity and insufficient physical activity are added, the percentage of cancers due to an unhealthy lifestyle rises to 60%.

The WHO identified tobacco use as the single most important risk factor for cancer. Consequently it is lung, stomach, liver, colon and breast cancer that cause the most cancer deaths each year.

Cancer is in many cases avoidable, and early detection increases the chance of cure substantially. Enough is already known about the causes to prevent at least one third of all cancers, and some of the most common types – including breast, colorectal and cervical cancer – can be cured if detected early.

The statistics paints the same picture in the US. According to The National Cancer Institute approximately 13.7 million Americans with a history of cancer were alive on January 1, 2012. About 1,660,290 new cancer cases are expected to be diagnosed in 2013. Cancer is the second most common cause of death in the US, exceeded only by heart disease, accounting for nearly 1 of every 4 deaths.**

GLOBOCAN —the WHO’s project to collect worldwide estimated cancer incidence, mortality, prevalence and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs)— revealed that in 2008, more than 70% of all cancer deaths occurred in low- and middle-income countries, which have few or no resources for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. The project also recorded nearly 12.7 million new cancer cases and 7.6 million cancer deaths occurred in 2008 worldwide. The number of new cancer cases ranges from 3.7 million in Eastern Asia to about 1800 in Micronesia/Polynesia.*** 

This year GE Healthcare is teaming up with the American Cancer Society (ACS) to further promote #GetFit. The organization has many ways GE Healthcare employees can personally get involved such as signing up for their third Cancer Prevention Study, which studies lifestyles and behaviors that may lead to cancer. Follow the ACS on Twitter to learn about more ways you can #finishthefight against cancer.

The #GetFit campaign, now in its third year, continues on the theme of cancer prevention and aims to capture global public awareness by promoting healthy habits that can help reduce the likelihood of developing cancer. #GetFit launched on May 28th. Visit the website (www.ge-getfit.com) to see how you can get involved.

 

References

* http://www.euro.who.int/en/what-we-do/health-topics/noncommunicable-diseases/cancer/facts-and-figures

**http://www.cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@epidemiologysurveilance/documents/document/acspc-036845.pdf

*** – http://globocan.iarc.fr/factsheet.asp