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In the Spotlight: GE Addresses Hospital Operations Management

GE

GE Healthcare's solution for the healthcare setting—Hospital Operations Management (HOM)—is already redefining the way hospitals and healthcare organizations are operated and managed.

GE

GE Healthcare believes that inefficient hospital management is having wider implications on patient care and quality.

HOM

HOM forms part of an emerging stable of technologies and services that can help the healthcare industry increase productivity and reduce costs. 

GE Healthcare believes its machine-to-machine solutions will lead the next wave of productivity as part of the "Industrial Internet" revolution. Its solution for the healthcare setting—Hospital Operations Management (HOM)—is already redefining the way hospitals and healthcare organizations are operated and managed.

HOM provides a unique opportunity to save hospitals both time and money in a global industry that accounted for 10 percent of global GDP in 2011. It has been estimated that in the U.S. alone over $100 billion in inefficiencies can be addressed through effective asset utilization and effective use of current IT systems. Inefficiencies in the system account for more than 10 percent of health expenditure meaning the global cost of health care inefficiency is at least $731 billion per year.*

GE Healthcare believes that inefficient hospital management is having wider implications on patient care and quality. It is reckoned that hospital acquired infections (HAI) have resulted in 99,000 deaths each year** costing $3-4 billion in healthcare costs.*** By promoting a holistic, data-driven approach to optimizing workflow, people, data, and technology, healthcare organizations can improve patient safety, facilitate efficiency, and reduce overall costs.

HOM forms part of an emerging stable of technologies and services that can help the healthcare industry increase productivity and reduce costs. This convergence of intelligent machines and data is known as the Industrial Internet. A system-level Industrial Internet application opens the possibility of creating something like an air-traffic control system for hospitals. Hospitals are comprised of thousands of pieces of critical equipment, much of which is mobile. The key is knowing where it all resides, and having a system that can alert doctors, nurses and technicians to changes in status, and provide metrics to improve resource utilization and patient and business outcomes.

“The Industrial Internet is revolutionizing the services we provide our customers, helping them become more efficient and productive,” said GE Chairman and CEO Jeff Immelt as he addressed the ‘Minds and Machines’ audience in November last year. “GE will leverage our $150 billion services backlog to develop technologies that improve the performance of our industrial products and grow our dollars per installed base 4-5 percent annually.”

“The internet has changed the way we consume information and talk with each other, but now it can do more,” Immelt continued. “By connecting intelligent machines to each other and ultimately to people, and by combining software and big data analytics, we can push the boundaries of physical and material sciences to change the way the world works.” 

GE Healthcare’s Hospital Operations Management solutions represent the beginning of the Industrial Internet in healthcare. GE Healthcare estimates that these innovations can translate into a 15-30 percent reduction in hospital equipment costs and permit healthcare workers to gain an additional hour of productivity on each shift. These approaches also help increase asset capacity utilization, workflow and hospital bed management. This could result in a 15-20 percent increase in patient throughput.
 

 

References

* – PricewaterhouseCoopers Health Research Institute (2010)

** – Estimating Health Care-Associated Infections and Deaths in U.S. Hospitals, 2002. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Public Health Reports / March–April 2007 / Volume 122.

*** – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2007.