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Spectacular Images Showing Research into Cancer, Neurodegenerative Disease & Fertility

GE Healthcare Life Sciences has revealed the winners of the 2013 Cell Imaging Competition. For seven years, GE Healthcare’s annual competition has showcased the beauty of cells and the inspiring research of cellular biologists from around the world. This year’s competition attracted over 100 entries from scientists who are using either high-content analysis or high- and super resolution microscopy to investigate at the cellular level a wide variety of diseases such as cancer, muscle disease and the effects of parasitic infections.

An expert scientific panel of six judges* shortlisted the finalists for each category ahead of the public vote.

Winner of the @GEHealthcare 2014 Cell Imaging Competition microscopy category, the image was taken by Vanessa Auld, from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada using the super resolution DeltaVision system. This fantastic image shows a neuromuscular junction of a fruit fly (drosophila). At this junction nerves connect to the muscle tissue, and here staining was used to identify the nerve ending (in red) and proteins outside the cells (in green and blue). This research is being used in the study of neurodegenerative diseases, that also effect movement, like Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and Huntington’s disease.

Winner of the @GEHealthcare 2014 Cell Imaging Competition microscopy category, the image was taken by Vanessa Auld, from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada using the super resolution DeltaVision system. This fantastic image shows a neuromuscular junction of a fruit fly (drosophila). At this junction nerves connect to the muscle tissue, and here staining was used to identify the nerve ending (in red) and proteins outside the cells (in green and blue). This research is being used in the study of neurodegenerative diseases, that also effect movement, like Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and Huntington’s disease.

 

Winner of the @GEHealthcare 2014 Cell Imaging Competition High Content Analysis category. The image was take by Martin Barr, from St James’s Hospital and Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland, using an IN Cell Analyzer imaging system.   This amazing image is of a cancerous lung cell. Known as an adenocarcinoma, it is a cancer that begins in cells found in the lining of internal organs. Most adenocarcinomas are found in the breast, pancreas, lung, prostate, and colon. In this image the cell has been stained to show the protein F-actin (green) which is involved in cell division, mitochondria "the cells power plants" (red) and DNA (blue); for research into cancers arising in these cells.

Winner of the @GEHealthcare 2014 Cell Imaging Competition High Content Analysis category. The image was take by Martin Barr, from St James’s Hospital and Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland, using an IN Cell Analyzer imaging system. This amazing image is of a cancerous lung cell. Known as an adenocarcinoma, it is a cancer that begins in cells found in the lining of internal organs. Most adenocarcinomas are found in the breast, pancreas, lung, prostate, and colon. In this image the cell has been stained to show the protein F-actin (green) which is involved in cell division, mitochondria “the cells power plants” (red) and DNA (blue); for research into cancers arising in these cells.

 

Regional winner of the @GEHealthcare 2014 Cell Imaging Competition. The image was taken by Graham Wright, Institute of Medical Biology, A*STAR, Singapore using the super resolution DeltaVision system. This beautiful image shows a mouse spermatocyte. The male equivalent of a female (immature & unfertilized) egg it is used to research fertility and understand its mechanisms. In the image proteins (KASH5 & SCP3), which are involved in cell division (meiosis), are shown in red and green, and DNA can be seen in blue.

Regional winner of the @GEHealthcare 2013 Cell Imaging Competition. The image was taken by Graham Wright, Institute of Medical Biology, A*STAR, Singapore using the super resolution DeltaVision system. This beautiful image shows a mouse spermatocyte. The male equivalent of a female (immature & unfertilized) egg it is used to research fertility and understand its mechanisms. In the image proteins (KASH5 & SCP3), which are involved in cell division (meiosis), are shown in red and green, and DNA can be seen in blue.

 

The winning images and gallery of all the finalists’ entries in this year’s Cell Imaging Competition are available at www.gelifesciences.com/cellimagecompetition

Follow @GECellBiology on Twitter for updates on the competition and cellular science.

 

Footnotes * – This year’s shortlist was selected by Paul Goodwin, Science Director, Cellular Imaging and Analysis at GE Healthcare; Geoffrey Grandjean, Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute, California and 2011 competition winner for the Americas; Julian P. Heath, Editor of Microscopy & Analysis; Carmen Laethem, Scientist and Project Manager, Aerie Pharmaceuticals; Kristie Nybo, Assistant Editor, BioTechniques and Nick Thomas, Principal Scientist at GE Healthcare.

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Cell Imaging Competition

Spectacular images showing research into cancer, neurodegenerative disease and fertility win GE Healthcare 2013 Cell Imaging Competition