Print Friendly

The Weekend Pulse: 7.4 billion cures for cancer, a solar farm for MRIs and personalized medicine progress

This week in health, science and tech: why cell therapy might no longer be DIY, how an MRI factory is using the power of the sun to make life-saving devices while helping to save the environment, and the U.S. President writes about precision  medicine. This weekend, catch up on what you might have missed from The Pulse and beyond.


There isn’t A cure for cancer. There are 7.4 billion.*

Trial_of_One_animation_3_701x394DIY is all the rage for Pinterest users and crafty hipsters, among whom ideas for “do it yourself” curtains, jewelry and wedding centerpieces have found a happy home.

Not so for PhDs and researchers, at least when it comes to those doing the life-saving work of cell therapy. This burgeoning life sciences field involves modifying a patient’s own cells to fight the world’s deadliest diseases, especially cancer. Despite an increased interest in personalized medicine, with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announcing major investments in partnerships across the U.S and the approval of the first CRISPR trial in humans, to date cell therapy has nearly been just that: DIY.

Read more


Teamwork, Commitment and Plenty of Sunlight Make Greener MRIs

GE_instawalk_florence-SC_MRI_20140722_0376-190It takes a lot of energy to make an MRI scanner. But in Florence, South Carolina, an MRI factory is using the power of the sun to make life-saving devices while helping to save the environment.

A new solar farm is being built around the 500,000-square-foot plant, managed by Dale Wolf. It produces over 900 superconducting magnets a year – a key component used in MRI machines the world over.

Read more


Barack Obama: Medicine’s next step

Boston Globe 

Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Health care is always personal. As science and technology have advanced, it’s become possible to make it personalized as well, giving us the tools to better understand, prevent, and treat everyone’s individual health needs.

Read more


Kenya takes steps to save mothers’ lives, showing why better data matters

WHO

Credit: WHO

Credit: WHO

In 2013, Kenya’s Ministry of Health was faced with a debate over the alarming rate of women dying in childbirth: was the cause deep-rooted cultural values, or could lives be saved with policy interventions?

Read more


On one of the world’s largest rivers, floating clinics bring doctors and medicines to millions

Quartz India

Credit: Devjyot Ghoshal

Credit: Devjyot Ghoshal

It had been raining all morning but Debika Mikum was still waiting. About a dozen women stood with her, huddled under their umbrellas.

Chacha had seen them from afar. He deftly brought the starboard parallel to the slippery bank, as Sanjay Pegu, the wiry deckhand, flung the anchor ashore. From the other end of the vessel, another rope flew out. It was quickly tied to the remains of a dead tree.

Read more


Get The Pulse on health, science and tech sent to your mobile weekly via WhatsApp: Message ‘Join’ via WhatsApp to +1-262-385-2937. Or subscribe for email story alerts at the top of this page.